"Jim Moore is the kind of poet who makes me want to read more poetry—more of his poetry, definitely, but also more poetry in general. He’s the kind of contemporary poet that reminds me that verse is not a lost art form, but is still living, still breathing, and always relevant."—The Poetry of Jim Moore: Lightning at Dinner

penamerican:

"But are not the dreams of poets and the tales of travelers notoriously false?" - "The Street"
Happy Birthday, H.P. Lovecraft!

penamerican:

"But are not the dreams of poets and the tales of travelers notoriously false?" - "The Street"

Happy Birthday, H.P. Lovecraft!

"I love the way a book connects people, even if some people loved it and some people hated it. Reading together means we entered the same story, we walked the same streets and witnessed the same deaths and weddings."

— Shauna Niequist, Bittersweet. (via squinchyfry)

(via teacoffeebooks)

"It’s an intensely personal thing—the space where you create and think. Do you have a messy desk, or an organized one? Do you do your best work in a place with lots of light and open space, or a cluttered and cozy library?

Sneak a peek into the workspaces of famously creative people—some are orderly and minimalistic, others are cluttered and chaotic—but all are uniquely suited to the habits and aesthetics of these artists, writers, and thinkers.”—Inspiring Workplaces of Famous Creatives

"We have art in order not to die of the truth."

— Friedrich Nietzsche (via observando)

(via poetsandwriters)

neil-gaiman:

whatdinosaur:

Well hello there signed copy, I was not expecting you! This was truly a surprise and I did scream when I saw it.

Was this the one I stealth-signed in the Penn Station Hudson Books?

Neil Gaiman, everyone: writer, secret book signer 

neil-gaiman:

whatdinosaur:

Well hello there signed copy, I was not expecting you! This was truly a surprise and I did scream when I saw it.

Was this the one I stealth-signed in the Penn Station Hudson Books?

Neil Gaiman, everyone: writer, secret book signer 

highwaydiamonds:

runecestershire:

lessthansix:

eglantinebr:

minutemanworld:

michaelmoonsbookshop:

A dictionary of the English Language by Samuel Johnson

London 1760

Johnson’s dictionary has some unusual definitions in it. 

Distiller: One who makes and sells pernicious and inflammatory spirits.

Dull: Not exhilaterating (sic); not delightful; as, to make dictionaries is dull work.

Excise: A hateful tax levied upon commodities, and adjudged not by the common judges of property, but wretches hired by those to whom excise is paid.

Far-fetch: A deep stratagem. A ludicrous word.

Pastern: The knee of a horse. (This is wrong. When Johnson was once asked how he came to make such a mistake, Boswell tells us he replied, ”Ignorance, Madam, pure ignorance.”)

Patron: One who countenances, supports or protects. Commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery.

Pension: An allowance made to any one without an equivalent. In England it is generally understood to mean pay given to a state hireling for treason to his country.

To worm: To deprive a dog of something, nobody knows what, under his tongue, which is said to prevent him, nobody knows why, from running mad

I particularly enjoy his definition of dull. 

He reminds me both of Jack Aubrey, and of Blackadder. Good company for him.

image

It keeps getting better!

Oh lord, how I love this. It goes from strength to strength and then adds the Blackadder cherry on top. (Don’t care what anyone says, the best Blackadder series is the 18th C. series.)

Never say that dictionaries can’t have personalities. 

(via powells)

"Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it."

— C.S. Lewis (via falling-forward)

(via teacoffeebooks)

"But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation."

The Pleasure of Reading to Impress Yourself - The New Yorker

Yayy literature!

(via nationalbook)

A writer for the New Yorker unearths a list of the books she read as a young adult. She responds to a question about the lack of “fun” or “guilty” reads on the list. 

(via nationalbook)